Friday, 28 January 2011

Every Home Should Have One

The Golden Bough: A Study in Magic and Religion
I'm not going to embarrass myself by trying to write something insightful about this mighty tome, for one thing I haven't read it all. I prefer to dip in and read random bits when the mood takes me or use it as a reference for deciphering the occult activities that I occasionally encounter.

Like when my neighbours nailed a dead crow to my front door. Apparently it's not a good sign. I may well have been expelled from the circle.

But, yes, every home should have one, it's essential reading.

Thursday, 27 January 2011

Glasgow's Secret Geometry

An Account of the Discovery of the Glasgow Network of Aligned Sites by Harry Bell
During the eighties amateur archaeologist Harry Bell discovered, catalogued and retraced Ancient Paleolithic Communication lines (Ley Lines). Convinced of their occult significance, he published his findings in an obscure pamphlet titled "Glasgow's Secret Geometry: The City's Oldest Mystery" (1984). One of his suggestions was that the Necropolis in Glasgows East End was a major convergance point for these lines and may well have been the site of a Druidic Temple dedicated to Moon worship.

Now Harry Bell's labour of love has become the starting point for an interactive website called "The Devil's Plantation"

Description from Head Heritage:-
It is partly an exploration of Harry Bell's pamphlet on Glasgow's geometry "Glasgow's Secret Geometry: The City's Oldest Mystery" (1984) which looks at connections between many ancient sites in and around Glasgow. But there is more... The filmmaker May Miles Thomas also draws in the story of a patient at Leverndale mental hospital who regularly absconded and would often be found at these sites. The patient never knew Harry Bell or of his pamphlet. She was in Leverndale mental hospital from the 1950's until the early 1990's. Psychogeography, mystery, ancient sites. The Devil's Plantation is a strange place to visit. navigation around the site is pretty straightforward and you can start where you left off each time you visit. 66 film clips and little panels of text draw you through the project.

The short films with their spooky soundracks are abstract mini portraits of each site. As you navigate round the site you are taken on a fractured journey round Glasgow, navigating the Paleolithic skeleton that lies underneath the city, poking into our world in unexpected places.

Monday, 24 January 2011

Sunday, 16 January 2011